Best Running Shoes

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Runnering Shoes 1449592 m.jpg

These reviews cover what I consider to be the best running shoes as well as some strong contenders and a few promising shoes that missed the mark. Based on The Science of Running Shoes, I believe that What to Look for in Running Shoes is a shoe that does not interfere with the way you run, though I include some shoes that can be useful in transitioning from a more traditional shoe.

1 Where to Buy

I generally recommend buying shoes from RoadRunnerSports.com as they allow you to run in the shoes and still return them for an exchange. It's hard to know how a shoe works for you until you've run in it for some distance. Another good option is Zappos.com which provides free shipping both ways, which allows you to spend time wearing the shoes around the house to see how they fit, though you can't run in them and return them.

2 Shoe Categories

I've classified my shoe recommendations into several categories, each with their own pros and cons.

  • Minimax (Minimum Drop, Maximum Cushioning). The minimal drop has been the hallmark of minimalist shoes, but these shoes also include lots of cushioning. At their best, these shoes can be like running barefoot on a cushioned track. Minimax shoes offer lots of protection and comfort. They are great for longer ultramarathons where sore feet become a problem and for trail running where the cushioning makes it easier to ignore smaller rocks and stones. However, the extra cushioning may increase the risk of injury compared with minimalist shoes and the extra sole thickness increases the stress on your ankle.
  • Optimal. These shoes ideally have just enough cushioning to improve Running Economy without the weight penalty of the Minimax shoes. These shoes are often called "racing shoes", or "racing flats", but I don't believe this term is appropriate any more. Many years go, a "racing flat" had little cushioning, but with the advances in materials science, these shoes are now surprisingly comfortable.
  • Minimalist. These shoes vary between the almost barefoot and those with a little more protection. I consider a shoe to be minimalist if it has insufficient cushioning to improve Running Economy.
  • Balanced. These are shoes that are part way between minimalist and Minimax, but are too heavy to be considered Optimal.
  • Traditional. The classic running shoe has a high heel, normally about 10mm higher than the forefoot . The biggest advantage of traditional shoes is the wide variety to choose from, making it far easier to find the right fit.

3 Unfamiliar Brands

You're probably familiar with brands like Nike, Adidas, New Balance, etc., but you may be less familiar with Hoka and Altra.

  • Hoka One One. The Hoka shoes started the 'Minimum Drop, Maximum Cushioning' style of shoe. The Hokas generally use extremely soft foam, with a wide base to improve stability. Their soles are thicker than most shoes so they are quite heavy, though not as heavy as they look. Most of the Hokas do well on both asphalt and rocky trails. The Hokas provide remarkable protection from rough trail surfaces, and the thick, soft soles mold themselves around stones to provide more grip on rocky trails than you'd expect. Other than the sole, the Hoka is a poor design, with a remarkably tight toe box and they are typically rather inflexible.
  • Altra. The two distinctive features of the Altra shoes are their zero drop and their shape which mirrors the shape of the human foot. Originally their shoes were quite minimalist with a thinner sole that was typically made of quite firm foam. More recently they have moved towards softer cushioning and the Minimax style.

4 Comparison Table

This table lists the key attributes of What to Look for in Running Shoes. For more detailed information, on the shoes see detailed shoe comparison.

Full Review Rating Recommended
price
Benefit Weight
(oz)
Penalty
(sec/mile)
Forefoot
Thickness
Heel
Thickness
Loaded Drop
mm
Cushioning Flexibility Longevity
Saucony Type A6 5.5 $100 5.3 6.1 9.5 17 21 4 5.0 8 3
Adidas Adios Boost 1.7 $140 3.0 8.6 13.4 17 27 11 4.0 7 4
Skechers GO Bionic 2 Review 6.0 $95 4.1 7.0 10.9 15 18 2 4.5 9 2
Hoka Bondi Review 5.8 $150 5.2 10.9 17.0 41 45 5 8.8 0 3
Hoka Clifton Review 9.4 $130 6.1 8.2 12.8 28 32 4 7.8 5 3
On Cloudracer 2.5 $130 3.7 8.2 12.8 19 27 5 4.7 8 3
Hoka Conquest Review 3.1 $170 3.2 11.9 18.5 28 34 5 6.0 3 3
Saucony Cortana 1.4 $150 2.3 9.9 18.7 22 28 5 4.3 5 3
Mizuno Cursoris Review 7.2 $120 3.5 6.4 12.4 17 17 -1 4.4 7 1
Asics Gel DS Racer 5.3 $110 5.3 7.0 10.9 21 26 6 5.8 6 3
Mizuno Wave Ekiden 2.6 $115 2.2 5.7 14.6 13 18 6 3.2 8 3
Adidas Energy Boost Review 4.4 $160 4.6 10.0 15.6 20 30 7 7.2 6 4
Puma Faas 100 R 7.2 $90 5.4 6.1 9.4 15 20 1 5.1 9 2
Nike Free 4.0 Review 3.3 $120 3.2 8.2 13.6 24 30 6 4.4 6 3
Asics Gel Lyte 33 3.8 $90 5.1 7.3 11.4 17 24 4 5.8 9 3
Skechers GOmeb Speed 2.9 $120 2.5 7.3 15.4 16 22 2 3.8 8 2
Skechers GORun 4.5 $100 3.9 7.5 11.7 15 23 3 4.5 7 2
Skechers GOrun Ultra Review 3.3 $80 5.4 9.3 14.5 26 40 10 7.8 7 1
Asics GT 2000 3.7 $120 3.1 11.2 17.4 28 35 5 5.4 4 3
Saucony Hattori Review 2.7 $80 1.3 4.6 19.5 11 11 1 2.6 9 2
Asics Gel Hyper Speed 6 Review 8.4 $85 6.5 5.9 9.2 19 25 5 6.0 8 3
Altra Instinct 8.0 $130 3.8 10.6 16.5 23 23 0 6.3 6 3
Saucony Kinvara 5 Review 5.8 $100 4.9 7.9 12.3 18 24 5 6.1 8 2
Nike LunarSpider 5.1 $125 4.4 6.7 10.4 17 21 3 4.6 7 3
Hoka Mafate Speed Review 6.1 $170 4.9 11.9 18.5 39 40 4 9.0 3 2
Pearl Izumi EM Road N0 4.5 $100 4.5 6.9 10.7 15 20 6 4.8 8 3
New Balance 980 Review 3.1 $110 2.9 10.1 15.7 21 30 5 4.6 5 3
Altra Olympus Review 5.5 $130 3.5 11.8 18.4 27 27 3 6.4 4 3
Altra One2 Review 8.2 $100 5.3 7.3 11.4 19 19 0 6.0 8 1
Altra Paradigm Review 7.2 $130 4.1 9.9 15.4 25 25 1 6.4 4 3
Brooks PureCadence 3 Review 5.5 $120 4.5 9.4 14.6 24 29 1 6.5 7 2
Brooks PureConnect 4.6 $100 3.7 9.0 13.9 20 23 0 5.2 7 2
Brooks PureFlow 3 Review 2.7 $100 3.5 9.5 14.8 22 27 3 5.2 7 2
New Balance RC1600 6.6 $110 5.6 5.6 8.7 15 21 5 4.9 8 3
New Balance RC5000 10.0 $125 7.8 3.4 5.3 13 17 3 4.2 8 3
Skechers GoRun Ride 3.0 $85 3.8 8.5 13.2 18 28 6 5.0 9 1
Hoka Stinson Lite Review 6.6 $160 4.7 11.6 18.1 35 40 6 8.5 2 3
Nike Zoom Streak LT 7.6 $75 6.0 5.5 8.6 15 19 4 5.2 9 3
Adidas Takumi Sen 2 Review 2.2 $150 2.0 6.9 16.5 17 22 6 3.2 7 3
Altra Torin Review 6.7 $120 4.0 9.0 14.0 20 20 3 5.5 5 3
Merrell Trail Glove 4.6 $100 0.8 6.9 24.7 11 11 0 2.0 9 5
Brooks Transcend 3.3 $170 3.3 12.6 19.6 30 36 6 6.5 4 3
Mizuno Wave Universe 5 Review 5.8 $125 3.1 3.1 10.6 9 12 1 3.3 9 2
Saucony Virrata 2 Review 6.2 $90 4.5 7.3 11.4 20 20 1 5.1 8 2

Reviews of shoes that are not recommended: Hoka Huaka Review, Patagonia EVERlong Review

5 Shoe Gallery

Images of the shoes reviewed on this site can be found in the Shoe Gallery.

6 Shoe Modifications

Main article: Shoe Modifications

Clockwise from the top: Nike Free 3.0 (early version) cut open more than most to form a 'running sandal', Saucony Hattori, NB Trail Minimus, Nike Free 3.0 and the Hoka.

With a few exceptions such as the Mizuno Curoris, I find that most shoes benefit from cutting open the toe box. This allows the toes to spread out as you toe off, creating more natural biomechanics and preventing toe blisters.

7 Shoe Dissection

Main article: Shoe Dissection

A comparison between the Altra Olympus and Hokas.

Ever wonder what the inside of your shoe looks like? Take a look inside; I've cut many of my shoes in half to reveal their construction, as you can see above. You can see a gallery at Shoe Dissection, as well as in the detailed shoe reviews.